Antacid Introduces
Unpleasant,
But All American
Adversary

  
“Take BiSoDoL Mint Flavored Tablets, that’s all!” 
                                                           -- Don Hancock

Lincoln, Me. (DG)— 

BiSoDoL BottleIf anything or anyone has/had a label of “American,” it’s usually a good thing.  For example, the term “All American” is the name for those college athletes who excel in their respective sports.  We also have baseball’s American League, football’s American Football Conference, and minor league hockey’s American Hockey League, which just so happens to have the Rochester Americans as one of its teams.  There were major companies over the years like the American Oil Company, the American Broadcasting Company, and the American Tobacco Company--- and for a time, Kellogg’s Corn Flakes was known as the “All American” breakfast cereal.  Overall, the word “American” gives us Americans a feeling of pride of who we are and the country we live in.  As positive as the word is, there would be an advertising promotion where “American” was, believe it or not, used in a negative light.  Of course, radio was the place where it was used, compliments of BiSoDoL Mints. Soundbyte  

The month and year in question was August 1945.  This was a time where it was both good news and bad news for the American people.  First the good news.  World War II was very close to a successful conclusion for the Allied forces.  With that good thought, how could there possibly be bad news?  With wartime living, whether it was working in defense plants, civilian jobs, maintaining the house, or volunteer work for the war effort, the lifestyle of the American people had developed the “get it done yesterday” attitude we are (unfortunately) so familiar with today.  In other words, everything was “hurry! hurry! hurry!”  In order to get ahead, the lifestyle of the American people shifted into overdrive.  If the typical human was designed to keep up with this fast and hectic pace, there wouldn’t be a BiSoDoL radio commercial on this subject; I wouldn’t be writing this article; and you wouldn’t be reading this tripe right now.  Unfortunately, humans weren’t made with “hurry up” in mind.   

Some of the results of fast paced living consisted of the typical human’s constantly high stress level and blood pressure; smokers would smoke more than they should; and the eating of meals was squeezed into a very small amount of time and at unusual hours.  Any or all of this bad stuff took its toll on a typical human with a very unpleasant consequence---heartburn, acid indigestion, and the feeling of fullness.  This unpleasant trio would be known on the radio for a name the people wouldn’t think of for something so awful--- the infamous “American Stomach.”  It’s obvious that the people couldn’t change the fast paced lifestyle they lived in, but they could definitely do something about the discomfort of “American Stomach.”  They found out exactly what to do by listening to the BiSoDoL Mints commercials on the FRONT PAGE FARRELL radio serial. 

On the commercial, program announcer, Don Hancock, described that although the American people in 1945 were energetic, there was also a price to pay for their energy and enthusiasm--- that disgusting “American Stomach!”  Hancock pointed out BiSoDoL Mints relieved the troubles of the ailment, but he also made it clear that BiSoDoL wasn’t a makeshift or complete cure-all remedy.  It was specially made to neutralize excess acid, soothe irritated membranes, and to provide a proper balance in the stomach.  When BiSoDoL finished its work, “American Stomach” was gone, and the human was feeling instant relief.  

BiSoDoL TinThere were 2 distinct advantages BiSoDoL Mints had over the competition in its never ending fight against “American Stomach.”  First, BiSoDoL Mints’ mint flavor was very pleasing to the taste buds, and second, BiSoDoL could be taken anywhere and any time the human happened to be when “American Stomach” was starting to make life miserable.  BiSoDoL's handy tin was easy to carry in pocket or purse--- and it cost only 25¢ to buy one.  The only requirement of the people was to make sure their BiSoDoL Mints tin had BiSoDoL Mints in it.  An empty tin--- even if it was a BiSoDoL Mints tin, wouldn’t do much good   

To sum all this stuff up, “American Stomach” may be as American as apple pie--- or the excess eating of apple pie, but the people back then were glad BiSoDoL Mints was specially made to take on this American ailment and defeat it soundly.